Saskatchewan Crop Development Lagging 




Crop development in Saskatchewan is lagging amid overly dry conditions in the western portions of the province and wet, cool weather in the east. 


The latest weekly crop report on Thursday showed more than half of the oilseeds in the province (54%) are behind in terms of normal development, along with 43% of the spring cereals. More than one-third of the pulses are also considered to be behind, as well as 20% of the fall cereals. 


Last year at this time, only 27% and 15% of the oilseeds and spring cereals were behind, respectively, along with 15% of the pulses and 20% of the fall cereals. 


There was rain throughout all regions of Saskatchewan this past week, with some areas seeing higher amounts of localized precipitation. Growing conditions have been reported to be good in the southeast and east central regions amid adequate moisture and warm weather. In the western regions, rain was received, which was needed to keep crop development progressing and support pasture growth. Producers who did not receive rain are reporting their crops are “starting to go backward in development,” the report said. 


Cropland topsoil moisture was rated as 9% surplus, 75% adequate, 15% short and 1% very short as of Monday, versus 7% surplus, 65% adequate, 19% short and 9% very short a week earlier. 


Southeast: 

Throughout most of the southeast, growing conditions are very good as moisture is abundant and there have been some warm days over the past week. Due to a delay in seeding for many producers, some crops will be emerging just now, but they should catch up if conditions remain favourable. 


Producers who have missed the last week of rain have noticed how quickly their fields have dried out. 

Rainfall varied in the region with some of the lowest volumes received being less than five mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and eleven per cent short.  


Regionally, 61 per cent of the fall cereals, 39 per cent of the spring cereals, 36 per cent of the oilseed crops and 51 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Twenty-eight per cent of the fall cereals, 56 per cent of the spring cereals, 63 per cent of the oilseed crops and 46 per cent of the pulse crops are behind in crop development. 


Southwest: 

Recent rains in the region will hopefully improve growing conditions and germination. Pasture and hay land in the region desperately needed the rain to help grass growth for grazing and hay yield, but a lot more rain is needed to fully rejuvenate them. 


There were some very strong winds throughout the region that dried out topsoil and the crop damage from the wind is still being assessed. The wind also hampered producers from being able to spray for weeds and insects. The region received anywhere from five mm to over 50 mm in the areas of high precipitation, with the hope water will find its way into dugouts and other water reservoirs used by cattle. Topsoil moisture in the region improved slightly this past week due to much needed rains but in the areas that received little rain and experienced strong winds, soils have dried. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 75 per cent adequate and 25 per cent short.  


Most of the crops in the region have been growing slowly, especially in areas that did not receive enough rain this week and or earlier in the spring.  


Regionally, 80 per cent of the fall cereals, 68 per cent of the spring cereals, 63 per cent of the oilseed crops and 67 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Ten per cent of the fall cereals, 29 per cent of the spring cereals, 37 per cent of the oilseed crops and 32 per cent of the pulse crops are behind schedule in their development. 


East-Central: 

The region received more rain this week and some areas of the region experienced flooding and drowning of some seeded crops. The rain stalled last minute attempts of some producers to get the last of their fields seeded. The rain also hampered spraying activities across the region. For most of the region crops germinated well and hay and pasture land is fairing well under the current growing conditions. 


Producers are now hoping for warm sunny days with minimal wind to allow their crops to grow rapidly. Weeds have been noted to be growing quickly now that daytime temperatures have been higher, but recent conditions have hampered attempts to control them. The topsoil moisture rating has improved once again with the almost weekly rain the region seems to receive. Cropland topsoil moisture rating is 17 per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate and 16 per cent short.  


Regionally, 76 per cent of the fall cereals, 41 per cent of the spring cereals, 28 per cent of the oilseed crops and 60 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Twenty-one per cent of the fall cereals, 58 per cent of the spring cereals, 72 per cent of the oilseed crops and 35 per cent of the pulse crops are behind in crop development. Cool weather and excess moisture delayed many crops early in the season. 


West-Central: 

Several areas of the region received substantial amounts of rainfall this past week, while other areas of the region received very little. In the areas that received large amounts, crops are improving and producers hope this will continue. There is a lot of late germination occurring across the region; producers hope more rain will come to help the fields that are still very patchy. 


Moisture conditions have also improved. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short, and five per cent very short.  


Crop development is still behind but nearing normal due to the previously dry conditions. In some areas crops have begun to rapidly mature in response to unfavourable growing conditions. Regionally, 58 per cent of the fall cereals, 30 per cent of the spring cereals, 52 per cent of the oilseed crops and 34 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Thirty per cent of the fall cereals, 43 per cent of the spring cereals, 52 per cent of the oilseed crops and 34 per cent of the pulse crops are behind their normal stage of development for this time of year. 


Northeast: 

Heavy rainfall was received this week across the region especially in the northern and eastern edges. Hot sunny days are now needed to accelerate crop and pasture growth since most crops are behind in development due to a late start to seeding. Some parts of the region experience some high-speed winds, which prevented all hopes of spraying herbicides. 


Moisture conditions have improved this week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 14 per cent surplus and 86 per cent adequate.  


Most of the crops in the northeast are behind to normal in their development stage. The cool temperatures in spring have slowed down growth in many areas. Warm temperatures and sunshine are needed to help speed up crop development. Regionally, 82 per cent of the fall cereals, 62 per cent of the spring cereals, 53 per cent of the oilseed crops and 79 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Zero per cent of the fall cereals, 38 per cent of the spring cereals, 47 per cent of the oilseed crops and 22 per cent of the pulse crops are behind in crop development. 


Northwest: 

The region received spotty rain showers over the past week, but producers were happy to get whatever moisture they could. Pastures have started to green up in parts of the region that were previously very dry. Some fields are now too wet to conduct in-crop spraying and producers hope weeds don’t get too large before they can get back into their fields. 


Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 12 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate, four per cent short and four per cent very short.  


Development of crops, hay and pasture in the northwest had been slow in recent weeks due to the cool temperatures, high winds and increasingly dry conditions. Now that some moisture and warmer temperatures have been received, crops should catch up quickly. Regionally, 62 per cent of the spring cereals, 70 per cent of the oilseed crops and 78 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. 23 per cent of the spring cereals, 29 per cent of the oilseed crops and 22 per cent of the pulse crops are behind schedule in their development. 


Source: DePutter Publishing Ltd.

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