Saskatchewan Harvest Near Three-Quarters Finished




Almost three-quarters of this year’s Saskatchewan crop is now in the bin as the harvest continues to progress well ahead of the average pace.


The weekly provincial crop report on Thursday pegged the overall harvest at 74% complete as of Monday, up from 56% a week earlier and 24 points ahead of the five-year average. An additional 17% of the crop was swathed or ready to straight combine as of Sunday.


Harvest is most advanced in the southwest region, where 85% of the crop was off as of Sunday. The southeast was 81% combined, followed by the west-central at 79%, the northeast at 69%, the east-central at 63%, and the northwest at 57%.


An estimated 99% of the lentils, 98% of the field peas, 86% of the mustard, 82% of the barley, 89% of the durum, 83% of the spring wheat, 54% of the canola and 25% of the flax was combined as of Sunday. An additional 34% of the canola was swathed or ready to straight-cut.


Durum grades are being estimated as 27% 1 CW, 34% 2 CW, 28% 3 CW and 11% 4 and 5 CW. Pea grades are estimated as 25% 1 CAN, 62% 2 CAN, 12% 3 CAN and 1% Sample grade. Lentil grades are estimated to be 20% 1 CAN, 62% 2 CAN, 15% 3 CAN and 3% Sample grade.


Most of the province received very little to no rainfall this past week. The Shaunavon and Gull Lake areas received the highest amount of rain with 15 mm. Topsoil moisture conditions in the province continue to deteriorate due to strong winds and minimal rainfall. Cropland topsoil moisture was rated as 36% adequate, 38% short and 26% very short as of Monday, versus 1% surplus, 38% adequate, 38% short and 23% very short a week earlier.


The majority of crop damage this past week was due to hail, wind and dry conditions. Frost was recorded in one rural municipality in the northwest region; damage will vary depending on the temperature and duration of the frost as well as the stage of the crop. At this point in the season, the damage will likely be minimal as most crops are matured enough to withstand a minimal frost. Wind has continued to blow swaths and shell out crops. There were also reports of damage caused by wildlife and waterfowl.


Producers are busy combining, swathing, hauling bales and moving cattle. Post-harvest activities are well underway where harvest has finished up and producers hope the weather holds out so that fall herbicide and fertilizer applications can be carried out without issue.


Southeast:

Great harvest progress was made this past week in the region. Eighty-one per cent of the crop has been combined, up from 67 per cent last week and remaining ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 62 per cent. An additional 13 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut.


Very little rainfall was received in the region this past week. The Whitewood area received the highest amount of rain with three mm. Once harvest is wrapped up, producers are hoping for high amounts of precipitation to replenish topsoil and subsoil moisture as well as ensure there are adequate water sources for livestock. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 47 per cent adequate, 41 per cent short and 12 per cent very short.


Durum grades in the region are currently being estimated as 32 per cent 1 CW, 32 per cent 2 CW, 22 per cent 3 CW and 14 per cent 4 and 5 CW. Pea grades are estimated as 28 per cent 1 CAN, 57 per cent 2 CAN, 13 per cent 3 CAN and two per cent Sample. Lentil grades are estimated to be 34 per cent 1 CAN, 48 per cent 2 CAN, 15 per cent 3 CAN and three per cent Sample.


The majority of crop damage past week was due to winds and drought. There were also reports of damage caused by waterfowl and wildlife that have trampled and or eaten crops still in the field.


Southwest:

Huge progress was made in the region this week, with 85 per cent of the crop now in the bin. This is up from 75 per cent last week and well ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 68 per cent. An additional eight per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut.


Rainfall in the region ranged from none to 15 mm in the Shaunavon and Gull Lake areas. Topsoil moisture conditions remain mainly short in the region even after seeing some small rain showers. High amounts of precipitation are needed in the region to improve moisture conditions for next year and replenish water sources for livestock. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent adequate, 50 per cent short and 25 per cent very short.


Durum grades in the region are currently being estimated as 27 per cent 1 CW, 31 per cent 2 CW, 32 per cent 3 CW and ten per cent 4 and 5 CW. Pea grades are estimated as 16 per cent 1 CAN, 66 per cent 2 CAN, 15 per cent 3 CAN and three per cent Sample. Lentil grades are estimated to be 10 per cent 1 CAN, 65 per cent 2 CAN, 20 per cent 3 CAN and five per cent Sample grade.


The majority of crop damage past week was due to drought, wind and hail. There were no reports of frost damage in the region, but the majority of crops in the region would avoid damage from frost due to being too mature or harvested.


East-Central:

A week without scattered rain showers in the region has allowed for good harvest progress to be made in the region. Sixty-three per cent of the crop has been combined, up from 38 per cent last week and ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 40 per cent. An additional 26 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Recent cool, damp temperatures from the previous week is causing some of the crop to come off tough and needing to be placed into aeration bins or dried.


Minimal rainfall was received in much of the east-central region. The highest amount of rain received this past week was six mm in the Foam Lake area. Warm, dry conditions are desired to aid with harvest progress, but many are hoping for high amounts of precipitation after harvest to replenish topsoil and subsoil moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 49 per cent adequate, 34 per cent short and 17 per cent very short.


Durum grades in the region are currently being estimated as 25 per cent 1 CW, 40 per cent 2 CW, 14 per cent 3 CW and 21 per cent 4 and 5 CW. Pea grades are estimated as 48 per cent 1 CAN, 46 per cent 2 CAN and six per cent 3 CAN. Lentil grades are estimated to be 35 per cent 1 CAN, 53 per cent 2 CAN and 12 per cent 3 CAN.


The majority of crop damage past week was due to wind and drought. Wind has caused swaths to blow around and for crops to shell out. There was one report of a light ground frost; due to the progress of harvest and how mature crops are in the region it is unlikely this frost caused very much damage at all.


West-Central:

Terrific harvest progress was made this week with 79 per cent of crop combined in the west-central region. This is up from 58 per cent last week and remaining well ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 48 per cent. An additional 11 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Reporters noted that many producers in the region have wrapped up their harvest or are very close to finishing.


Rainfall in the west-central region ranged from none to 7.5 mm in the Macklin area. Topsoil moisture continues to deplete in the region and there are concerns of fire hazards in the field. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent adequate, 41 per cent short and 34 per cent very short.


Durum grades in the region are currently being estimated as 16 per cent 1 CW, 52 per cent 2 CW, 29 per cent 3 CW and three per cent 4 and 5 CW. Pea grades are estimated as 19 per cent 1 CAN, 76 per cent 2 CAN, five per cent 3 CAN. Lentil grades are estimated to be 23 per cent 1 CAN, 72 per cent 2 CAN and five per cent 3 CAN.


The majority of crop damage this past week was due to wind and drought. Winds have been blowing swaths around and shelling out crops. The recent moisture in the region has caused regrowth of unharvested crops and is making harvesting challenging or delaying it entirely in order for the regrowth to be sprayed out.


Northeast:

Producers are making good progress with harvest and some have finished harvesting all together. Sixty-nine per cent of the crop is now combined, which is up significantly from 34 per cent last week and well ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 29 per cent. An additional 21 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. A lot of the crop is coming off tough and is needing to be placed in aeration bins or dried.


There was little rainfall received in the region this past week, ranging from none to five mm in the Spruce Home area. Warm, dry conditions are desired to support harvest progress but rain is hoped for after harvest is complete in the region. Moisture conditions in the region have declined this week with less land being rated adequate for moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 38 per cent adequate, 51 per cent short and eleven per cent very short.


Pea grades are estimated as 23 per cent 1 CAN, 63 per cent 2 CAN and 14 per cent 3 CAN.

The majority of crop damage past week was due to wind, waterfowl and a light frost. The frost likely will not have caused significant damage to any standing crops.


Northwest:

Harvest was delayed a few days due to some scattered rain showers but producers were still able to make very good progress. Fifty-seven per cent of the crop has been combined, up from 37 per cent last week and well ahead of the five-year (2016-2020) average for this time of year of 19 per cent. An additional 35 per cent of the crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Producers are hoping for warm, dry conditions for the remainder of harvest.


Rainfall was spotty throughout the region this week. The North Battleford area received the highest amount of rain this week with 15 mm. Much of the crop is coming off tough and damp and needing to be dried. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 27 per cent adequate, 35 per cent short and 38 per cent very short.


Pea grades are estimated as 27 per cent 1 CAN, 49 per cent 2 CAN, 24 per cent 3 CAN.


The majority of crop damage past week was due to frost in the Mayfair area, wind and wildlife.


Source: DePutter Publishing Ltd.

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