Saskatchewan Topsoil Moisture Continues to Erode




Saskatchewan topsoil moisture conditions continued to deteriorate this past week despite good amounts of rainfall in some parts of the province.


According to the latest weekly crop report on Thursday, thunderstorms brought as much as 40mm of rain to the Cando area and anywhere from about 23 to 37mm to other more northern areas of the province. On the other hand, the southern half of the province saw small only localized showers with amounts ranging from just 2 to 12mm.


“Higher amounts of rain in the northern regions have slightly improved moisture conditions in the area, but there are more fields rated as having short or very short moisture in the remaining regions of the province this week,” the report said.


Cropland topsoil moisture was rated as 0% surplus, 56% adequate, 40% short and 4% very short as of Monday, compared to 0% surplus, 72% adequate, 20% short and 8% very short a week earlier.


Dry conditions continue to delay pasture and hay land growth and have delayed emergence of smaller seeded crops, such as canola and flax, the report said, noting the majority of crop damage this past week was due to strong winds, dry soil conditions and insects (including flea beetles and cutworms).


An estimated 18% of the fall cereal crops were reported as being in the shot blade stage and 18% heading as of Monday, while 51% of the spring cereals are emerging and 38% are tillering. Canola is 42% emerging and 40% is in the seedling stage, along with 30% of flax being in the seedling stage. Almost half (48%) of pulse crops were emerging and 45% were in the vegetative stage.


Seeding is virtually complete throughout the province at 99% done, with a few fields being seeded for green feed and silage.


Southeast:

Seeding is 99 per cent complete in the region, this is just ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 98 per cent. Producers are continuing to seed green feed and are spraying for flea beetles with hopes to avoid reseeding of canola in the region.


Producers were happy to receive rainfall this week, but more is required throughout the region. Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 12 mm in the Indian Head area.


With the minimal rainfall in the region, as well as continued winds, moisture levels were slightly reduced compared to the previous week. Hay land and pastures will also need more moisture to be able to support livestock feeding in the summer. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 54 per cent adequate, 38 per cent short and eight per cent very short.


Most crops are looking good but growth is slow. In many parts of the region canola crops have reduced germination and emergence due to dry conditions; some reseeding is underway.


Thirty-three per cent of the fall cereal crops are in the shot blade stage and eight per cent are heading, while 48 per cent of the spring cereals are tillering. Thirty-one per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 43 per cent is in the seedling stage and 31 per cent of the flax in the seedling stage. Forty-two per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and 48 per cent is in the vegetative stage.


Southwest:

Ninety-nine per cent of the crop is seeded, which is just ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 98 per cent. There are a few remaining fields being seeded for green feed and silage.


There were very small amounts of rainfall throughout the southwest region this week. The Shaunavon and Rockglen areas reported the most rain this week with three mm.


Moisture conditions have fallen in the region due to lack of rain this week and strong dry winds. Crops are generally in good condition but could use more rainfall and the hay and pasture land need more rainfall along with warmer temperatures to support growth. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 44 per cent adequate, 53 per cent short and three per cent very short.


Some areas of the region have poor canola germination due to winds and dry topsoil; there have also been reports of damaged seedlings from the strong winds and some of these areas will be reseeded while others will not.


Forty-three per cent of the fall cereal crops are in the shot blade stage and 17 per cent are heading, while 35 per cent of the spring cereals are tillering. Forty-six per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 42 per cent is in the seedling stage while 37 per cent of flax in the seedling stage. Fifty-two per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and 40 per cent is in the vegetative stage.


East-Central:

Seeding is at 99 per cent complete, ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 97 per cent. With seeding wrapping up in the region, producers are focusing more on weed and flea beetle control. The earlier seeded crops are emerging and growing well, but canola germination and emergence is slow in some areas because of the dry soil conditions.


The Esterhazy and Craik areas reported the highest amount of rainfall in the region this week with seven mm. The crop, hay and pasture land moisture conditions continue to decline due to low amounts of rainfall and strong dry winds. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 52 per cent adequate and 44 per cent short and four per cent very short.


Twenty per cent of the fall cereal crops are in the shot blade stage and 16 per cent are heading, while 31 per cent of the spring cereals are tillering. Forty-four per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 32 per cent is in the seedling stage, along with 19 per cent of flax. Forty per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and 56 per cent is in the vegetative stage.


West-Central:

Seeding is 99 per cent complete, ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 97 per cent. Producers are still planning to seed green feed in the region. With recent rainfall, hay land and pasture conditions are expected to improve. Warmer temperatures are desired to help improve crop and pasture growth.


The west-central region welcomed the rainfall received over the weekend. The Cando area received the highest amount of rain this week with 40 mm. The majority of the region received rainfall this week, but it did not significantly improve moisture conditions. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as zero per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 42 per cent short and five per cent very short.


There were reports of uneven germination and emergence of canola, but with the recent rains in the west-central region this is expected to improve.


Forty per cent of the fall cereal crops are in the shot blade stage and 18 per cent are heading, while 37 per cent of the spring cereals are tillering. Forty-five per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 41 per cent is in the seedling stage, along with 38 per cent of flax in the seedling stage. Forty-nine per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and 49 per cent is in the vegetative stage.


The majority of crop damage this week was due to strong winds that toppled bins and damaged buildings, flea beetles, hail and localized flooding in low spots that received high amounts of rainfall. There are reports of a tornado that touched down around the Eagle Creek Hutterite colony that damaged some buildings and bins.


Northeast:

Seeding is 99 per cent complete in the region, which is ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 95 per cent. Many producers are wrapping up, but there were delays in seeding for some due to the rainfall received this week. Reseeding has been reported due to flea beetle and cutworm damage.


The Kinistino area received the highest amount of rain this week with 37 mm. With the rainfall received this week, moisture conditions were maintained with most fields being rated as largely adequate and a little short for topsoil moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 85 per cent adequate and 15 per cent short.


Germination and emergence is even in crops throughout the northeast region, but cool temperatures have slowed development in some areas.


Thirty-eight per cent of the spring cereals are emerging and five per cent are tillering. Forty-eight per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 45 per cent is in the seedling stage. Twenty-nine per cent of flax is in the seedling stage while 31 per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and sixty-nine per cent are in the vegetative stage.


Northwest:

Seeding is 99 per cent complete in this region, this is ahead of the five-year average (2016-2020) for this time of year of 96 per cent. Some fields are going to be seeded with green feed once they dry up enough to get back into.


Many parts of the region received decent amounts of rain this week, the rain is very welcomed by producers and will help improve pasture and crop development.


The Duck Lake area received the most rainfall in the region this week with 23 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as zero per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and two per cent very short.


Fifty-four per cent of the spring cereals are emerging and 36 per cent are tillering. Thirty-eight per cent of canola and mustard is emerging and 49 per cent is in the seedling stage. Forty-four per cent of flax is in the seedling stage. Sixty per cent of the pulse crops are emerging and 38 per cent is in the vegetative stage.


Source: DePutter Publishing Ltd.

Information contained herein is believed to be accurate but is not guaranteed by the parties providing it. Syngenta, DePutter Publishing Ltd. and their information sources assume no responsibility or liability for any action taken as a result of any information or advice contained in these reports, and any action taken is solely at the liability and responsibility of the user.